JUST A RANDOM COLLECTION OF SARANAC LAKE STUFF


REMEMBER THE SARANAC LAKE / KATRINA CONNECTION?
HERE ARE THE DRAMATIC EMAILS PLUS AN AMAZING VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH SARANAC LAKERS AFFECTED BY KATRINA.


WHICH WILL BE THE FINAL VERSION OF WAL-MART? PICK ONE.
FINAL VERSION 1
OR
FINAL VERSION 2



Four ships in the United States Navy have been named USS Saranac after the river that flows through Saranac Lake.
The first Saranac was a brig, built in 1814 and decommissioned on 12 December 1818, condemned, and sold at New York City.
The second Saranac was a sloop of war, launched in 1848 and sunk on Ripple Rock, Seymour Narrows, Vancouver Island with no fatalities in 1875.
The third Saranac was a minelayer, built in 1899, acquired by the Navy in 1917 and decommissioned in 1919.
The fourth Saranac (AO-74) was commissioned in 1943 and decommissioned in 1946.
BELOW IS THE SECOND USS SARANAC





USS Saranac (1848) a sloop of war -- was laid down in 1847 during the Mexican-American War; however, by the time she completed sea trials, the war was over. She was commissioned in 1850 and saw service protecting American interests in the Atlantic Ocean as well as the Pacific Ocean. When the American Civil War broke out, Saranac patrolled Americas West Coast. Retained by the Navy post-war, she continued serving her country until wrecking in 1875.

BELOW IS FOURTH USS SARANAC





Final Disposition, sold, 4 December 1957, to Hugo Neu Corporation, New York, NY, for use as a power facility abroad by International Steel and Metal Corporation
This USS Saranac received five battle stars for World War II service.



IS GEESEPEACE THE ANSWER TO SARANAC LAKE'S GOOSE PROBLEM?

OR IS THIS A BETTER IDEA?



EXCLUSIVE: The design for the new Lake Placid museum was stolen from a homeless old man!











A look into the crystal ball reveals the possible evolution of the proposed community store. In these days of financial insecurity this independance would be a GOOD thing! Check out the Saranac Lake of 2027!



GO AHEAD, GIVE 'EM A CALL!



MY GRANDSON, CHRIS, HAS ALWAYS HAD A STRANGE FASCINATION WITH ROCKS.




KID'S CREATIVE COOKERY

Ms. Williams' 1st grade class in Bloomingdale Elementary School produced a book of tasy recipes for Father's Day 2006. Tired of the usual fare? Take a minute to check out these creative treats. You'll be glad you did!



SARANAC LAKE TRIVIA TIDBIT

SARANAC, MICHIGAN ?
Saranac, Michigan (Boston Township)

CHECK IT OUT!

In 1836 the land on which the Village of Saranac, Michigan now stands was purchased from the US Government by Judge Jefferson Morrison. Judge Morrison was born and raised in Saranac Lake and so named the town, Saranac. In 1851 the village was renamed Boston, but eight years later returned to the name of Saranac. - Present population: 1,461




THE PREVIOUS SUBJECT FOR THE SARANAC LAKE FORUM, THE MISS-SPELLING OF SCHROETER'S FIELD, DREW A GREAT RESPONSE!---CHECK THE FORUM PAGE TO SEE YOUR INPUT!

Drop a letter to the editor at the Adirondack Daily Enterprise link below to voice YOUR opinion on local issues! Go to "Virtual News Room".




Early SLCHS building problem. Temporary halt!
OOPS!







SOME INTERESTING READING


CAUTION: READING THE WATERFRONT REVITALIZATION PROJECT IN IT'S ENTIRETY MAY CAUSE PERMANENT BRAIN DAMAGE!!





POETRY IN (SLOW) MOTION
This "Random Scoot" is not based on an individual but on the demise of a local tradition. Certain groups, in their zeal to create the perfect society based on their own righteous tastes, have forced us to conform to a more "socially acceptable" lifestyle. Being Socially Correct can also be pretty boring.


The old-time war canoe races, which were a popular feature in past Willard Hanmer Guideboat and Canoe Races, are a good example. In these races each bar in town (32 to be exact) participated in sponsoring a team consisting of eight of it's most athletic clients. Strength was a big factor in this selection, as the transporting of beer coolers on the carry was of utmost importance. Each competitor was allowed only one cooler of beer.


The races were conducted with a certain "enivre risquer noyer". (Translated from the French: enivre, meaning "drunk" and risquer noyer, meaning "to risk drowning".)


I was discussing this subject with an old friend, Sandy Richardson, over strawberry shortcake and Coke at the canoe races last July. In earlier years we would have been on our third case of Bud but the old beer truck had long ago given in to the socially correct era of non-alcoholic beverages. (Incidentally, on that day Sandy took first prize in the one man event for his age group, sixty something.)

We were lamenting about the way the event had slowly transformed into a "Norman Rockwell" type of affair, as we downed our Coke and shortcake. One race in particular came to mind. In 1970 an entry from The Porch Restaurant hit the finish line six hours after the start cannon fired. We couldn't remember who was on the craft or what the delay was. We did recall that it was called the Poetry in Motion and that we were still at the Fish and Game club unloading the beer truck, two bottles at a time when they finally crossed the finish line.


Ironically, a week or so after talking to Sandy at the race I was visiting with another old friend, Tom Hennessy, and discovered that he was one of the crew of Poetry In Motion, on that fateful race day in 1970. On the crew that year was, Nick Logie, Bumper Branch, Eldred Gauthier, Johnny Garwood, Tom Hennessy, Terry Bailey, Bump Lyons and Loren Vaughn. Tom explained that the delay was caused by two unscheduled stops. The first stop was brought about by a realization that they didn't have the required allotment of beer aboard. By this time they were at the carry and, being close to the Waterhole, they sent the cabin boy, Eldred Gauthier, to fetch more rations. Eldred didn't return promptly, so First Mate Brian Patnode, went to retrieve him. Bumper Branch was later sent to bring back the two deserters. Eventually the whole remaining crew went to carry back the three missing men. As they finally made their way down the river they realized that the beer was warm so they disembarked once more at the Pine Street overpass and walked a short distance to The Belvedere for some colder beer. One thing led to another and they forgot about the race until Johnny Garwood, owner of the Porch Restaurant and sponsor of the crew, who the team had invertently forgotten back at the Waterhole, saw the craft at the Pine Street bridge and followed the trail of empties to the Belvedere. A pep-talk ensued and soon the crew was on it's way to the Fish and Game Club, six hours late. Strangely enough, they took first place, beating Jim Miller's "Safari Racing Team" by 45 seconds. Jim's team had also stopped at the Belvedere, but stayed longer.


Tom Hennessy furnished me with the faded 30 something year old photos on the top of the page.


AN AMAZINGLY IRONIC FOOTNOTE

Last August I was reading a book by Paul Schneider called, THE ADIRONDACKS, A History Of America's First Wilderness. In one chapter Paul was waxing poetic about the White Pine Camp, which was the summer home of Calvin Coolidge in 1926. I came across the following passage about the POETRY IN MOTION in chapter 23 on page 283 and I quote it exactly:


"Lying diagonally across the rough wooden floor is an enormous wood-and-canvas canoe, almost thirty feet long. There are several holes in it's hull, and patches of rot, but it is cheerfully colored. Someone long ago had painted bright blue and yellow stripes diagonally along both bow and stern. In foot high letters just beneath the gunnels amidships they painted the name; Poetry In Motion. And in smaller letters, running along the entire length of the boat, are the hand painted names of children long grown up who presumably once paddled the great canoe around Osgood Pond or some other Adirondack lake. Don, John, Tom, Brian, Loren, Bumper, Eldred.

There is a curious forlorn quality to the Poetry In Motion that will most likely survive the growth of a tourist destination around it. It is not a eerie thing, though, like the black log buildings of Santanoni. There, if you peer into the main lodge, the only surviving bits of the old days are a ghostly white stuffed beaver keeping company on the mantel with a nearly featherless stuffed egret.

The Poetry In Motion is just somebody's old friend, left behind to decompose while far across Osgood Pond, in front of another camp barely discernable through the trees, paddles still flash on certain summer afternoons."


(I stopped out to see the famous canoe that month but was informed that it had made a last voyage to the Lake Clear dump only days before.)

Ah, if you only knew the true history of that canoe, Paul. It would have made a much more interesting story.




BUY YOUR WINTER CARNIVAL BUTTONS, T-SHIRTS AND OTHER ITEMS FROM THE SARANAC LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STORE!

PICS FROM THE GARDNER REUNION IN 2008








TEMPORARY